New BP Oil Spill in the Arctic: Up to 4,200 Gallons Leaked from Pipeline

BP has a long history of oil spills in the Arctic. (Photo: Wikimedia Commons)

Not content to let Exxon hog all the attention, BP has just sprung back into the spotlight with yet another oil spill — this time in Alaska’s North Slope tundra.

From Reuters:

BP said on Monday that a pipeline at its 30,000 barrel-per-day Lisburne field, which is currently closed for maintenance, ruptured during testing and spilled a mixture of methanol and oily water onto the tundra….

The Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation said the spill occurred on Saturday and amounted to 2,100 to 4,200 gallons, affecting 4,960 square feet of gravel pad and about 2,040 square feet of wet and aquatic tundra.

This is a small spill, but it’s important for the public to take notice. For too long, we’ve been letting the oil industry dump poison into the environment and then sweep it under the rug (or water, or dirt, or snow). Heck, most of us seem to have already forgotten about the Gulf oil spill. Maybe the two recent pipeline leaks will wake us up.

Joe Romm pointed out that BP’s operations in the Arctic, just like their marine counterparts, have a dirty track record. For example:

  • The 2006 Prudhoe Bay incident when 267,000 gallons (~6400 barrels) of oil and chemicals leaked from unmonitored, corroded pipeline.
  • llegal toxic substances dumping on Alaska’s North Slope.
  • According to data compiled from the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation spill database, 1.3 million gallons of toxic substances were spilled between 1996 and 2000.
  • The November 29, 2010 Prudhoe Bay spill in which 46,000 gallons leaked.
Wherever fossil fuel companies go, they cause toxic, often irreparable, damage–whether it’s Alaska, Montana, Louisiana or Ecuador. And they don’t care. Yet they want us to forgive and forget. It was an accident. Won’t happen again. We don’t need regulations. Regulations are bad for you. Yuck. Not like oil, oil is good.
How much longer are going to believe that?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s